Posts Categorized: Professional Standards

An Audit Example – Part 1, PLAN and DO

This blog is going to go through a practical example of audit and the results.  Last week we identified a long list of areas of practice that could be audited.  There were several areas of practice that I was interested in auditing – patient outcomes, care of ‘maintenance’ patients and letter writing. Please note I am not an audit expert, just an ordinary clinical osteopath, like most of my readers.  If you want expert opinion on audit please seek advice from NCOR I am just sharing a practical example of Continue Reading »

NICE LBP guidelines part 2 – what do they mean for osteopaths?

This is part 2 of discussion of the new NICE guideline on low back pain and sciatica.  Part 1 looked at the content of the guidelines – what you should/shouldn’t be doing. Part 2 considers how the guideline applies to osteopaths. Do we have to follow guidelines? It is probably not a coincidence that an article was published in Manual Therapy in October titled Quiet Dissent: The attitudes, beliefs and behaviours of osteopaths who reject low back pain guidance.  This is an excellent piece of research for providing an insight Continue Reading »

2016 NICE Guidelines Low Back Pain – Part 1

The new NICE guidelines for the management of low back pain have been published.  This article is going to look at what the guidelines say and part 2 will look at how the guideline applies to osteopaths. The guidelines are now much simpler referring to just low back pain with or without sciatica and occasionally chronic or persistent low back pain. Low back pain and sciatica in over 16s First of all rule out any underlying conditions, refer if concerned. Risk stratification is recommended to identify those likely to improve Continue Reading »

Associates – standards of practice are your responsibility

If you work in a practice as an associate you may feel you are protected by being under the umbrella of the practice name and the principal.  Most osteopaths work as self-employed, sole-traders and all are registered with the GOsC as an individual practitioner – therefore you should have in mind that you stand alone.  As discussed in a previous blog, being self-employed has the disadvantage of foregoing the rights and protection associated with employment. So what? The reason I am highlighting this point is that you need to make Continue Reading »

What are your rights in practice? Have you suffered?

This article was prompted by a discussion in one of the Osteopathic Groups on facebook.  There were a number of osteopaths giving examples of discrimination in the clinic.  Perhaps you are someone who has experienced this.  This article seeks to look at discrimination and what action you can take. Equality law protects against 9 characteristics – age, gender, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity, disability, sexual orientation, religion, race, and marriage. Working as self-employed means you may not be covered by equality law in the workplace – this is a right Continue Reading »

Learning from complaints and concerns latest report

NCOR has published its report for 2013-15 on complaints and concerns raised about osteopaths.  It is well worth reading to gain an understanding of weak areas in the profession and to learn from others to maintain safety and confidence in your practice. Complaints and concerns rose to 369 in 2015, a significant increase from the 257 in 2014.  This was fuelled by the increase in advertising complaints which were 156, compared to 9 in 2014.  As usual concerns are almost half and half between conduct and clinical care.  If we Continue Reading »

Informing patients 5: Knee Pain – Benefits and Risks and Treatment Alternatives

An information resource for practitioners The law on consent require health practitioners to inform patients of the benefits and risks of treatment and alternative treatments.  This article is part of a series to equip practitioners to inform their patients.  It is to be noted that it is difficult to find information on benefits and risks of treatments so please feel free to provide feedback so we can develop this resource. This list is a generalised list to use a resource and needs to be applied using your osteopathic expertise, based Continue Reading »

Informing patients 4: Hip Pain – Benefits and Risks and Treatment Alternatives

An information resource for practitioners The law on consent require health practitioners to inform patients of the benefits and risks of treatment and alternative treatments.  This article is part of a series to equip practitioners to inform their patients.  It is to be noted that it is difficult to find information on benefits and risks of treatments so please feel free to provide feedback so we can develop this resource. This list is a generalised list to use a resource and needs to be applied using your osteopathic expertise, based Continue Reading »

Informing patients 3: Elbow Pain – Benefits and Risks and Treatment Alternatives

An information resource for practitioners The law on consent require health practitioners to inform patients of the benefits and risks of treatment and alternative treatments.  This article is part of a series to equip practitioners to inform their patients.  It is to be noted that it is difficult to find information on benefits and risks of treatments so please feel free to provide feedback so we can develop this resource. This list is a generalised list to use a resource and needs to be applied using your osteopathic expertise, based Continue Reading »

The law on consent changed – what’s new?

The focus of the law on consent changed last year as a result of a landmark legal decision. The change to consent law is consistent with the advice that we have been giving regarding gaining consent with a patient focussed approach, in keeping with the latest research and medical standards.  It is worth understanding the laws relating to consent so that you can be confident that your consent procedures are following the law.  Really this is just the law catching up with what professional standards have been requiring for a Continue Reading »