Posts Categorized: Osteopathic News

Is the ASA really that bad?

Many of you will have heard of the ongoing case of Nicholas Handol and his ongoing breach of the advertising code which has culminated in a hearing before the General Osteopathic Council Professional Conduct Committee.  It is not appropriate for me to comment on this case.  There has been wide discussion of the case and misunderstandings of GOsC and their relationship to the ASA. I thought it would be helpful to discuss the ASA and it’s relationship to Osteopaths. Who are the ASA? “The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is the Continue Reading »

Considering Regulatory Reform

The government consultation on Regulatory Reform in Healthcare is open until 23rd January and you are free to have your say: Promoting Professionalism, Reforming Regulation https://consultations.dh.gov.uk/professional-regulation/regulatory-reform/ This consultation is extremely important for healthcare professionals and something you should be keeping a watchful eye on. There are currently 9 healthcare regulators in the UK, and around 1.5 million healthcare professionals. The number of professionals regulated by each regulator varies from a few 1000 to almost 700 000. Each of the regulators has common aims in terms of protecting the public, setting Continue Reading »

What’s the future for Osteopathy – a new model or a Jenga type deconstruction?

This blog is the result of many months, even years, of reading literature on pain science, physiotherapy and osteopathy culminating in this summary article.  I hope that it will open up discussion with colleagues so that together we can have a vision for the future of osteopathy. It has felt as though a ‘Jenga’ type scenario has been taking place with blocks of evidence, skills and knowledge which were the foundation of my osteopathic education and practice being removed leaving what felt like a very unstable foundation for osteopathy.  I Continue Reading »

Like what you read? Join our new Facebook Group

We’re now building a community on facebook in our Mint Practice Group.  We’ll still be following the subject of the month but providing practical and interactive information to support one another in practice.  This month’s theme is Reflection. Please come and join us: https://www.facebook.com/groups/mintpractice/

ASA guidelines for osteopaths treating babies and children

The new ASA guidance for marketing claims for pregnancy, children and babies for osteopaths are an excellent resource.  A document has been produced with clear advice and examples about what you can and can’t claim.  Remember that advertising applies to all your print and online communications as well as testimonials.  You need to be careful with social media communication. Whilst I am sure there will still be some frustration amongst practitioners the ASA clearly states that if the osteopathic profession produce the evidence they will endorse the advertising.  They have Continue Reading »

NICE LBP guidelines part 2 – what do they mean for osteopaths?

This is part 2 of discussion of the new NICE guideline on low back pain and sciatica.  Part 1 looked at the content of the guidelines – what you should/shouldn’t be doing. Part 2 considers how the guideline applies to osteopaths. Do we have to follow guidelines? It is probably not a coincidence that an article was published in Manual Therapy in October titled Quiet Dissent: The attitudes, beliefs and behaviours of osteopaths who reject low back pain guidance.  This is an excellent piece of research for providing an insight Continue Reading »

Associates – standards of practice are your responsibility

If you work in a practice as an associate you may feel you are protected by being under the umbrella of the practice name and the principal.  Most osteopaths work as self-employed, sole-traders and all are registered with the GOsC as an individual practitioner – therefore you should have in mind that you stand alone.  As discussed in a previous blog, being self-employed has the disadvantage of foregoing the rights and protection associated with employment. So what? The reason I am highlighting this point is that you need to make Continue Reading »

European Standard for Osteopathy

This week an event took place in the European Parliament to mark the launch of the European Standard on Osteopathic Healthcare Provision.  This was the product of a 4 year project involving a number of Osteopathic organisations. The European Standard does not replace the UK laws relating to Osteopathy or in any other country with legislation.  It serves to provide a standards of care in European countries without any legislation. They have produced two leaflets, available in several languages: European Standard for Osteopathy information leaflet ‘What to expect from your Continue Reading »

Learning from complaints and concerns latest report

NCOR has published its report for 2013-15 on complaints and concerns raised about osteopaths.  It is well worth reading to gain an understanding of weak areas in the profession and to learn from others to maintain safety and confidence in your practice. Complaints and concerns rose to 369 in 2015, a significant increase from the 257 in 2014.  This was fuelled by the increase in advertising complaints which were 156, compared to 9 in 2014.  As usual concerns are almost half and half between conduct and clinical care.  If we Continue Reading »

New opportunities for Osteopathy in the workplace

The HSE has introduced a new workplace Health and Safety strategy.  The campaign is called Helping Great Britain work well.  Before you groan and stop reading, this could present a great opportunity for osteopaths.  Firstly I am going to briefly discuss the relevance to patients and clinics as employees and work-places and then highlight the opportunities arising from this change and point you to some resources to help you make a proposal to businesses. Great Britain has a world class health and safety reputation but the HSE is aiming to Continue Reading »