Are you ready for the new data protection rules?

The new Data Protection rules come into force on 25th May 2018.  The Information Commissioners Office is helping people to prepare with webinars and courses.  You can watch the webinar for Health Sector small businesses here:  (scroll down the page for the webinar) There are also free workshops as follows: 11 October 2017: Congress Centre, 28 Great Russell Street, London 7 November 2017: Crowne Plaza Hotel, Central Square, Birmingham 9 November 2017: Principal Hotel, Oxford Road, Manchester Here is a Mint Practice Summary of the rules as applied to Osteopaths: Continue Reading »

What’s the future for Osteopathy – a new model or a Jenga type deconstruction?

This blog is the result of many months, even years, of reading literature on pain science, physiotherapy and osteopathy culminating in this summary article.  I hope that it will open up discussion with colleagues so that together we can have a vision for the future of osteopathy. It has felt as though a ‘Jenga’ type scenario has been taking place with blocks of evidence, skills and knowledge which were the foundation of my osteopathic education and practice being removed leaving what felt like a very unstable foundation for osteopathy.  I Continue Reading »

First Aid in your Practice

In the most recent Osteopath magazine a question was asked “What First Aid First Aid requirements do I need for my practice?” and readers were referred to the HSE website.  Here is a summary of the information HSE gives applied to osteopathic practice. The Short Answer All clinics should have a first aid kit. Legally – an appointed person is adequate Morally – always having someone trained in first-aid at your clinic would seem a reasonable expectation.  Emergency First Aid at Work is adequate training for clinics. (presuming you don’t Continue Reading »

Shared Decision Making

Shared decision making is the basis for consent and communication.  Over many years there has quite rightly been a drive away from paternalism in healthcare.  This has led to emphasis on shared decision making where the patient and practitioner both contribute to formulating the plan of action. Paternalism still persiting Despite many years of trying to influence change paternalism is still present in our healthcare system.  Dr Oliver Thompson demonstrated in his research that it is still present in osteopathy, which many osteopaths will not be surprised to learn:   Continue Reading »

Communication in Osteopathic Clinics

What is communication? Communication is “the imparting or exchanging of information by speaking, writing, or using some other medium.” You may already have read our recent blogs that looked at words the harm and words that heal and how words can be nociceptive.  Today we are considering how you communicate and the purpose of communication in your clinic. Within your clinic there are many ways you communicate to your patients – both verbal and non-verbal: The practice environment Your reception staff Website and literature First impressions Your persona/body language Patient Continue Reading »

The Osteopaths’ role as an Educator

Osteopaths have a wealth of knowledge about health and wellness which can be used to promote the wellness of the general population.  Training has equipped you to be a healthcare practitioner but how well are you to be an educator? How do you educate patients? You educate patients when you: Explain what osteopathy is Explain the benefits and risks of osteopathy Explain the reason for their symptoms Treatment choices Empower them to take an active role in regaining health Your patients will come with a set of beliefs about their Continue Reading »

Patient Education part 2: Words that heal

Communication is not just about the words we use but also the way in which we deliver those words.  In order to provide helpful words to patients, you need to understand what their beliefs and understanding of their condition is.  What are they avoiding?  What do they think the long-term effects of their condition will be? Placebo/nocebo response to sham intereventions is a very interesting phenomena.  Why do people have responses to sham treatments and some very dramatic responses at that?  There are many extreme examples that could be cited.  Continue Reading »

Patient Education Part 1: Words that Harm

When we think of communication the primary tool that comes to mind is speech.  Within the clinic setting we have an extremely important role in communicating with our patients an understanding of their condition.  Arguably the most important role we play is as health educators.  Research is showing again and again that one of the keys to better outcomes with patients is education in order to empower patients to take control of their own health. The words we use to communicate to our patients an understanding of their condition can Continue Reading »

The Patient story…

This is the first post in our new series on Communication. One of the key components of clinical practice is successfully understanding the patient story.  This is the foundation of understanding the clinical, educational, and psychological needs of the patient. Here are a few principles to help with effective communication and understanding the patient: Don’t Interupt You may have heard the commonly quoted 23 seconds that it takes before a practitioner usually interrupts a patient’s story.  However, if you let your patient speak continuously, most will finish after 60 seconds Continue Reading »

Learning from clinical experiences

Inevitably in your career you are going to have experiences that cause you an upset.  This could be a complaint against you – formal or informal, an adverse event after treatment, principal-associate issues, business disputes or lots of other situations.  A bad experience can really knock your confidence and have negative effects on how you practice.  Equally a bad experience could become a positive experience helping to develop and inform your practice to become a better practitioner. Negative or Positive? There are two factors that can make all the difference Continue Reading »